Charles Hinley - Curiosities of Street Literature, 1871.

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Charles Hinley - Curiosities of Street Literature, 1871.

175.00

Curiosities of Street Literature, 1871

Charles Hinley, ed.

London: Reeves And Turner, 1871. Half-Leather with boards in maroon cloth. Previously repaired.  245 pp. 4to. (9 x 10 in.) Very good condition with some scuffing along the edge of the cover and small imperfections on the edges of each page. Small amounts of writing in pencil on the inside endpaper.

This book is a collection of “…Cocks,” or “Catchpennies,” a large and curious assortment of street-drolleries, squibs, histories, comic tales in prose and verse, broadsides on the royal family, political litanies, dialogues, catechisms, acts of parliament, street political papers, a variety of “ballads on a subject,” dying speeches and confessions of the soon-to-be-execututed. For example: “come, all you feeling-hearted Christians, wherever you may be, attention give to these few lines, and listen unto me; it’s of this cruel murder, to you I will unfold, the bare recital of the same will make your blood run cold.” 

 

Each of these tales or articles comes from an English broadsheet paper, which was an ancestor of today’s tabloid newspaper and even some television shows. Broadsheet papers featured exciting tales often about crimes, executions, and political events. Some famous crimes listed in this book includes the cases of Burke and Hare, Constance Kent, and the Red Barn Murder. Much of what was described in these articles was written in verse to add to the excitement of the story. Many of the articles included also come with the original illustrations and feature vignettes of scenes of everyday life to mass hangings. The text is also printed as close as possible to its original format and font. There are five sections consisting of hundreds of articles in total. This is number 62 out of 100 copies printed.

 

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